The Ideal Box (for inbound FBA shipments)

Part of the cost to ship product to Amazon using UPS is the physical dimensions of the box. However, if the box isn’t heavy enough compared to its size, UPS charges dimensional weight. Large, light boxes can end up costing way more for shipping and eat into your bottom line. Use these calculators to find out what your box needs to weigh to avoid dimensional weight charges and see what all the common box sizes would need to weigh.

Get the PDF version.

Calculate based on box size

X X inches

Select your dimensions…

Common box size reference table

Directions: Adjust the slider to match your longest dimension, rounding to the nearest whole number (1.01 to 1.49 = 1 and 1.50 to 1.99 = 2). The table will update to display the necessary physical weight for the remaining two dimensions.

Length: inches

Height (in)
Width (in)
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
12
14
16
18
20
22
24

Notes:
1 At this weight, dimensional and physical are the same. It's whatever. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
2 You'll always be paying dimension weight charges at this size.


Frequently Asked Questions

If my package doesn't weigh enough, can I fudge it and say my package is heavier?
Sure, but the actual cost for weight doesn't change, regardless if it's measured dimensionally or physically. 20 pounds is 20 pounds.
Why doesn't the table slider go below 12 inches?
I opted to cut it off at 12 inches on the small side because after speaking with sellers, their most commonly used box sizes weren't smaller than 12 inches in any dimension. If you need an odd size, use the calculator.
What's the math for calculating dimensional weight?
Rounding up to the nearest whole number, use: width · height · depth / 139.
Why doesn't the table show values for some sizes?
If the cell's value is `n/a`, the physical weight would be larger than the 50-pound maximum single-box weight Amazon dictates. See Note #2 below the table.
My math had a more specific number (decimal). What gives?
UPS rounds up to the next pound when calculating the weight for which to charge. Because of that, it made sense to present values based on that same methodology.
FedEx always seemd to be cheaper...
Of course, but they're not a partnered carrier for Amazon inbound shipments, anymore. Such is life.
Does this work for USPS?
The calculators don't, but the math is the same. USPS' divisor is `166`.
Does this apply to UPS' retail (non-partnered-carrier) rates?
No. Retail rates use the divisor of `166`.